The National Academies

The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

In 2014, of the four economic sectors, which used the most energy in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the industrial sector represented 32% of U.S. energy use, while transportation was 28%. Residential and commercial were 22% and 19% respectively.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the industrial sector represented 32% of U.S. energy use, while transportation was 28%. Residential and commercial were 22% and 19% respectively.

  • Correct!

    In 2014, the industrial sector represented 32% of U.S. energy use, while transportation was 28%. Residential and commercial were 22% and 19% respectively.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the industrial sector represented 32% of U.S. energy use, while transportation was 28%. Residential and commercial were 22% and 19% respectively.

What is the commonly accepted unit of measurement for electric current—or the amount of an electric charge passing a point per unit time?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Correct!

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

Energy intensity is a measure of:

  • Correct!

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

On average, how much solar radiation reaches each square meter of earth?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    On average, even after passing through hundreds of kilometers of air on a clear day, solar radiation reaches Earth with enough energy in a single square meter to run a mid-size desktop computer-if all the sunlight could be captured and converted to electricity.

  • Correct!

    On average, even after passing through hundreds of kilometers of air on a clear day, solar radiation reaches Earth with enough energy in a single square meter to run a mid-size desktop computer-if all the sunlight could be captured and converted to electricity.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    On average, even after passing through hundreds of kilometers of air on a clear day, solar radiation reaches Earth with enough energy in a single square meter to run a mid-size desktop computer-if all the sunlight could be captured and converted to electricity.

Which of the following energy sources releases carbon dioxide when burned?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Correct!

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

Between 1980 and 2012, after fuel economy standards where put in place, which of the following has happened to vehicles?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Improved vehicle efficiency has allowed for increases in weight, horsepower and fuel economy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Improved vehicle efficiency has allowed for increases in weight, horsepower and fuel economy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Improved vehicle efficiency has allowed for increases in weight, horsepower and fuel economy.

  • Correct!

    Improved vehicle efficiency has allowed for increases in weight, horsepower and fuel economy.

In 2014, approximately how much of the oil used in the U.S. was imported?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States imported approximately 27% of its oil. More than one-third of that came from Canada.

  • Correct!

    The United States imported approximately 27% of its oil. More than one-third of that came from Canada.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States imported approximately 27% of its oil. More than one-third of that came from Canada.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States imported approximately 27% of its oil. More than one-third of that came from Canada.

Which of the following is not considered to be a drawback to wind energy?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Correct!

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

Which residential usage consumes the largest amount of energy?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Consuming the largest amount of energy, space heating accounts for 31% of all residential energy used. Space cooling accounts for an additional 12% of energy usage.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Consuming the largest amount of energy, space heating accounts for 31% of all residential energy used. Space cooling accounts for an additional 12% of energy usage.

  • Correct!

    Consuming the largest amount of energy, space heating accounts for 31% of all residential energy used. Space cooling accounts for an additional 12% of energy usage.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Consuming the largest amount of energy, space heating accounts for 31% of all residential energy used. Space cooling accounts for an additional 12% of energy usage.

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